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Extreme Scooter Rider Shares His Tricks and Flips

Written By: Matthew J. Black
Photographed By: Damien Noble Andrews

Expert: Clayton Lindley
Credentials: Extreme Scooter Rider

The high flying, trick master of freestyle scootering, Clayton Lindley, is lighting up skate parks across Encinitas and San Diego, and now he’s taking his skills to three different continents before the year is over. Before he left, we caught up with him to talk shop, and learned how a fast paced, extreme type of guy keeps on pushing the boundaries.

Q: Where do you hail from, and is that where you started a life of freestyle scootering?

Clayton Lindley: I grew up in Amarillo, Texas and moved to San Diego when I was 16 years old. That’s when I started scootering. I did a lot of other action sports too. I skated, I rode BMX and I raced dirt bikes. I also wake skate and long board, so pretty much everything. But scootering has always been the most fun.

Q: When I first called you, we had to reschedule because you were in line at a concert. What was the name of that one again?

CL: XXX Tentacion. There was a big brawl and like 30 cops showed up. It was very high energy. I was having a blast, but unfortunately I only got to see about 30 seconds of his performance. He was on stage and got hit in the face. Then a guy ran on stage and punched him in the face. It’s on my Instagram. Go watch it, it’s there. Crazy.

Q: What got you into scootering, and who brought you to your first skate park?

CL: Actually, I did it for the first time after watching a video. Where I lived I was the only scooter rider. My friend Justin and I were the only ones that did action sports. We watched a bunch of YouTube videos and that’s what got us into it. Justin is more of a skater, and he really helped me progress.

Q: How did it feel when you first heard you made the Root Industries Team?

CL: I joined [in March]. I felt great! The Root Team has a lot of talented riders.

Q: What’s on the agenda for you and the Root Industries Team to close out 2017?

CL: It’s kind of crazy actually. I’m going to Barcelona on Saturday for a contest called Extreme Barcelona in June. Then I fly back to LA, and then I go straight to Utah for games. I’ll also be going to Australia in August where Root Industries is based out of. I’ll be competing in San Diego in July also, at the 2017 Scooter Farm Street Jam. After summer it dies down. Then I’ll mainly be training and adding to Instagram, and there’s also my YouTube stuff.

Q: How big is the freestyle scooter population at skate parks versus skateboarders?

CL: Massive. It depends on what skate park really, but scootering has definitely taken over skateboarding. I know in Australia, surfing is number one and scootering is number two. This shift has really taken place over the last four to five years.

Q: Do you see a lot of younger kids trying out freestyle scootering?

CL: It’s pretty much the main market for scootering. Kids especially get into it when they’re 12-16 years old. But I also see a lot of older guys too. There’s even a handful of 50 plus year old scooter riders. The age range is about 6-50.

Q: How do the tricks you’re able to do, and people watching your abilities inspire others to try freestyle scootering?

CL: I get a lot of direct messages on my Instagram from people. If I post something and a kid really likes it, they tag it. Then when they show me videos of them trying it out the next day it’s really cool. The kids watch my tricks and try to do what I do. A lot of kids look up to me because they think it’s a really cool thing.

Q: Can you give us a taste of what trick you’re working on now?

CL: No problem! I’m working on a ‘front flip’ Buttercup, which has a ‘tail whip,’ ‘bri,’ and a ‘tail whip’ all while I do a ‘front flip.’ I’m also working on a ‘pop up’ Superman, with a ‘double front flip’ and a ‘tail whip.’ I’ve done the first, but the last one I haven’t really attempted yet. I know I can do it though.

Q: What keeps you driving toward learning new tricks and challenging yourself regularly?

CL: I’d say it’s probably just the feeling you get when you land a new trick after trying to land it for a couple hours. You fall a lot, and you get angry. But then when you finally land it, it’s the best feeling in the world. When you want to learn a new trick, the feeling you get when you do is what makes it worthwhile. It’s like that in all sports.

Clayton Lindley@claytonlindley

Photoshoot Location:
Krause Family Skate & Bike Park
3401 Clairemont Dr.
San Diego, CA 92117
858.246.6731

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