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We Hope to See Jordyn Barratt at the Olympics in 2020!

Written By: Lauren Muller Vans US Open of Surfing Park Series

The Vans US Open of Surfing presented by Swatch, one of the largest action sports festivals in the world, came to a close in Huntington Beach following nine days of competition featuring some of the best surfers, skateboarders and BMX riders from across the globe. The Vans Park Series (VPS) skateboarding competition  holds five global events each year with the championships being held this coming October. Huntington Beach was the third stop on the 2018 tour.

We caught up with 19-year-old Hawaiian native Jordyn Barratt right off her 2nd place win in the Vans Park Series Women’s event. Currently living in Encinitas, Barratt discussed life as a competitive skateboarder, her thoughts on women getting recognition in the male-dominated sport and her excitement about potentially skateboarding for the first time in the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo.  

In 2016, Jordyn became the first female junior pro surfer to compete both in surfing and skating at the Vans US Open. Barratt’s skating style stands out because of years of surfing, growing up in Hawaii and, in recent years, she has taken her passion on both boards and turned competitive, earning spots in various competitions for both surfing and skateboarding, including a recent silver medal at the X Games earlier this year in the Women’s Skateboard Park final.

 

Q: How were you introduced to skateboarding and what got you started?

Jordyn Barratt: When I was in 6th grade, some kids wanted to go to the skate park they just built by my house, so I went with them and just loved it right away

Q: Were there any early influences on your skating?

JB: I grew up in Hawaii as a surfer, and the feeling of surfing on the concrete was awesome! I also had a lot of legendary people around me all the time and they taught me a lot about the surf and skate world.

Q: What do you love most about skateboarding?

JB: The feeling of flying around in a bowl or park and doing airs!

Q: Where do you see women’s skateboarding in 10 years?

JB: Hopefully just called skateboarding and not being seen as any different if you are a girl or a guy! I also think that there will be just as many girls skating in 10 years as there are guys…I see it growing every year, so that is really awesome!

Q: On a typical day, how many hours do you spend skateboarding?

JB: Three to four per day and hopefully an hour or two surfing!

Q: Was there a point in your skateboarding growing up when you realized that you might be able to do this as a career?

JB: Only just in the last year or two since the announcement of the inclusion into the Olympics, and that spurred on equal prize purses in almost all events now. Before that, a girl made about one quarter or maybe one third what a guy did in a contest, so we could never have made a living that way.

Q: Besides skateboarding, what do you like to do in your spare time?

JB: I like to hang out with friends at the beach, play with my golden retriever Kula, travel and work in my journal!

Q: It seems like women are finally getting more and more recognition in skateboarding. What do you think are the reasons for that?

JB: The Olympics have forced events to have equality for men and women and because the media has seen what we can do…it is taking off now.

Q: What piece of advice do you have to give to other young girls who are part of a male-dominated industry?

JB: Do what you love no matter what industry it is in; if it makes you happy you are on the right path.

Q: How would you describe your skating style?

JB: Kind of surfy-style because I like going fast and was always taught that speed, power and flow are important, so I think that is a big part of my style.

Q: What is your favorite trick to do and how long did it take you to learn it?

JB: My favorite tricks tend to change but I like doing frontside inverts. That one took a couple weeks to learn to do consistently!

Q: What are your thoughts on skateboarding heading into the Olympics?

JB: I am super excited that it will be an Olympic sport and I would love to represent the USA!

Q: In your travels, which country do you feel embraces skateboarding the most?

JB: Lots of other countries love skateboarding. Australia has so many skate parks right on the beach all up and down the coast that are beautiful. I recently just got back from Spain and the people there love skateboarding and are super loud and excited anytime someone does a trick. Brazil has a huge amount of kids coming up, both boys and girls, so that is super cool to see, too! A contest in Sweden I did two years ago had some of the biggest crowds I have ever seen. So I guess pretty much everywhere skateboarding is [a] part of the culture.

Q: What life lessons have you learned as a result of skateboarding and traveling?

JB: I have learned that, when you fall down, you have to get up and try again until you stop falling. I have also learned that hard work has good rewards and I have learned that everywhere I go people treat you the way you treat them so it’s important to always be kind and respectful of people and cultures.

Q: What are your plans for the future? Are you already looking ahead to the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo?

JB: Yes for sure. I am working on learning new tricks for upcoming events and can’t wait to hopefully go to Tokyo in 2020!

The Final Results

Vans Park Series Women’s Pro Tour ResultsVans US Open of Surfing Park Series
1st: Kisa Nakamura (Japan)Vans US Open of Surfing Park Series
2nd:  Jordyn Barratt (USA)Vans US Open of Surfing Park Series
3rd:   Brighton Zeuner (USA)Vans US Open of Surfing Park Series

Vans Park Series Men’s Pro Tour Results  Vans US Open of Surfing Park Series
1st: Zion Wright (USA)
2nd: Pedro Barros (Brazil) Vans US Open of Surfing Park Series
3rd: Jagger Eaton (USA)Vans US Open of Surfing Park Series